Sorrento and the Ruins of Herculaneum

Our ship docked in Naples.  Since we’ve been to Naples we caught the hydrofoil fast ferry to visit Sorrento.

DSC03063 C Sorrento

The town of Sorrento is perched high above its small port.  Walking into town culminated in a climb up a thousand stairs to Piazza Tasso.  I admit that’s just an estimate.  I was too winded to get a picture of the stairs – you’ll have to take my word for it.

DSC03118 C

Here’s the view looking back toward the port.  (One can take a cab to get up here instead of the stairs.)

DSC03070 C Piazza Tasso

Piazza Tasso is a lively square.  St. Antonino Abbate, in the middle of the street, tries to slow down the traffic.

DSC03080 C  DSC03119 C

DSC03082 C Torquato Tasso Torquato Tasso was a poet. 

His statue is in a small garden on the edge of the square.

We enjoyed wandering through the narrow streets and peeking inside doorways when we could.

DSC03083 C pretty courtyard

DSC03085 C  DSC03086 C

DSC03090 -92 C Sorrento Cathedral Stitch  DSC03093 C

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DSC03105 -6 C Sorrento men's Club Stitch

The Sorrento Men’s Club, a hangout for men only, used to be where the town’s nobles met.  The frescos make it feel like a palace.

DSC03111 C Piazza S Antonino

Piazza St. Antonio is a much quieter square.

DSC03116 C St Antonino

DSC03113 -14 C Stitch

This view is looking out over the port of Sorrento.

A short train ride north of Sorrento are the ruins of Herculaneum.  This ancient city was destroyed in the same eruption of Mount Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii in AD 79.

DSC03122 -24 C Stitch

The city of Herculaneum was hit with a different type of flow from the volcano than Pompeii.  Wooden roof tops, building beams, beds, doors and even food were preserved.

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You can see how the “new” city overlooks the ruins.  Actually the city sits on top of the ruins.  75% of the old city remains buried.

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DSC03128 C bones in the Fornici

This is the gruesome view as you walk down into the ruins.  Over 300 skeletons were found in these boat houses that used to be along the shore line.  Before this find, It was thought that the city had been evacuated.

DSC03129 C Ancient Beach

DSC03130 C Casa d'Argo  DSC03133 C

DSC03134 C  frescos Seat of the Augustali

DSC03138 -41 C Stitch

DSC03143 C Bottega ad Cucumas wine shop  DSC03144 C

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DSC03147 C Menu  DSC03153 C

A menu was painted on the wall and this was the soup bar!

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DSC03159 C House of Neptune & Amphitrite

DSC03160 C  DSC03162 C

It’s a much smaller site than Pompeii.  You can easily wander the streets without getting lost.  You only have to look up to see the city above to get your bearings.

DSC03163 C Casa Sannitica  DSC03167 C

DSC03168 C Palestra  DSC03170 C

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DSC03178 C baths  DSC03181 C

Herculaneum is a great substitute for Pompeii if you don’t have a full day to tour.  It doesn’t have the scope but it is filled with treasures!

DSC03057 C  Another day ends.

We’re off to the next port…

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About graciamc

Gracia's Travels is a photo blog. I always take too many pictures on trips so I justify my compulsion with this blog! The blog is mostly photos - they tell the best part of the story. Please contact me if you would like to use any of my photos.
This entry was posted in Herculaneum, Italy, Sorrento and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Sorrento and the Ruins of Herculaneum

  1. Lisa HArding says:

    Fantastic, Gracia! You are giving me the travel bug. I have all of these posts saved on my computer, but promise not to pirate your photos w/out permission! lol Hugs! Lisa

    • graciamc says:

      Thanks, Lisa. The nice thing about doing this blog is that the pictures will be on wordpress forever! This is what I do instead of photo albums. My friends and family can look or not and stop when they’ve had enough. Hi to Neil.

  2. Kamila Pala says:

    Beautiful virtual tour! Thanks for taking me there. The last photo is amazing. Bye. K

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